viernes 22 de enero de 2021
Sociedad | Coronavirus | Covid-19 | Indonesia

National Geographic y la foto más macabra del impacto del virus en la humanidad

La imagen de una víctima mortal de Covid-19 en Indonesia ofrece una visión "desgarradora" y "espeluznante" de la pandemia. El testimonio del fotógrafo.

Es que la revista National Geographic eligió la imagen para que sea la portada de la edición de agosto y tras su difusión rápidamente generó repercusión.

Tras la muerte del paciente, las enfermeras del centro de salud envolvieron el cadáver en capas de plástico y además aplicaron desinfectante con el fin de evitar la propagación de la enfermedad.

To photograph the victims of coronavirus in Indonesia is the most heartbreaking, most eerie photography I have ever done. In my mind at the time I only thought what happened to this person may well happen to people I love, people we all love.I’ve witnessed first hand how the doctors and nurses are continuously risking their lives to save ours. They are the true heroes of this story, and the only way to appreciate their work is to follow what they advise us. We felt it was absolutely crucial that this image must be made. To understand and connect to the human impact of this devastating virus. The image is published here today as a reminder and a warning, of the ever looming danger. To inform us of the human cost of coronavirus and how world governments have let matters get so far. As we head towards the second wave of the pandemic, people must realise they cannot take this matter lightly.This photograph accompanies an article that appears in the National Geographic Magazine @natgeo in the new upcoming August 2020 issue. LINK IN BIO. It is also the first time I’d see the image in print. There are many people to thank, most notably @kayaleeberne, in which this is the first print NG story she edited; @jamesbwellford for reacting on the story from early on; @andritambunan, @kkobre, and @paullowephotography for their advice; and last but not least my mentor @geertvankesterenphoto for his unrelenting support since day one. I would like to dedicate this to the medical staff – whose selfless efforts allow us to continue to live. I am truly humbled to be in their midst countering this pandemic. And to my late Uncle Felix who, two years before he passed away earlier this year, sent me an email: ‘Keep on taking pictures and never fail to report to let the world know what has really happened.’Please share this story and please act.This is the pandemic of our lifetime. We must win this battle.Supported by the @forhannafoundation and @insidenatgeo COVID-19 Emergency Fund for Journalist.@natgeointhefield #natgeo #joshuairwandi #natgeoemergencyfund #documentaryphotography #photography #covid19 #covidstories #nationalgeographicsociety #pandemic #stayathome
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To photograph the victims of coronavirus in Indonesia is the most heartbreaking, most eerie photography I have ever done. In my mind at the time I only thought what happened to this person may well happen to people I love, people we all love. I’ve witnessed first hand how the doctors and nurses are continuously risking their lives to save ours. They are the true heroes of this story, and the only way to appreciate their work is to follow what they advise us. We felt it was absolutely crucial that this image must be made. To understand and connect to the human impact of this devastating virus. The image is published here today as a reminder and a warning, of the ever looming danger. To inform us of the human cost of coronavirus and how world governments have let matters get so far. As we head towards the second wave of the pandemic, people must realise they cannot take this matter lightly. This photograph accompanies an article that appears in the National Geographic Magazine @natgeo in the new upcoming August 2020 issue. LINK IN BIO. It is also the first time I’d see the image in print. There are many people to thank, most notably @kayaleeberne, in which this is the first print NG story she edited; @jamesbwellford for reacting on the story from early on; @andritambunan, @kkobre, and @paullowephotography for their advice; and last but not least my mentor @geertvankesterenphoto for his unrelenting support since day one. I would like to dedicate this to the medical staff – whose selfless efforts allow us to continue to live. I am truly humbled to be in their midst countering this pandemic. And to my late Uncle Felix who, two years before he passed away earlier this year, sent me an email: ‘Keep on taking pictures and never fail to report to let the world know what has really happened.’ Please share this story and please act. This is the pandemic of our lifetime. We must win this battle. Supported by the @forhannafoundation and @insidenatgeo COVID-19 Emergency Fund for Journalist. @natgeointhefield #natgeo #joshuairwandi #natgeoemergencyfund #documentaryphotography #photography #covid19 #covidstories #nationalgeographicsociety #pandemic #stayathome

A post shared by Joshua Irwandi (@joshirwandi) on

La imagen fue obtenida por el fotógrafo Joshua Irwandi en un hospital en Indonesia. La fotografía retratada por el joven, de 28 años, muestra el cuerpo de una presunta víctima de Covid-19.

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Por su parte, Fred Ritchin, decano emérito del Centro Internacional de Fotografía, manifestó: “Aquí tenemos una persona momificada. Te hace mirarlo, sentir terror. Para mí, la imagen era de alguien arrojado, desechado, envuelto en celofán, rociado con desinfectante, momificado, deshumanizado”.

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